Things to do in Valencia all the year

Valencia is the third largest city in Spain after Madrid and Barcelona. While its two bigger sisters steal much of the tourism limelight, Valencia has quietly risen through the ranks and is now a worthy contender. The city has much going for it; a stunning medieval core, a multitude of architectural styles, urban savvy, colourful festivals, a vibrant nightlife and gastronomic scene, and a laid-back beach vibe make Valencia an attractive destination for all sorts of visitors. What I particularly like about Valencia is the fact that many attractions in the city centre are within walking distance whilst the City of Arts & Sciences, beaches and marina are easily accessible via the city’s efficient public transportation network. The Valencia Tourist Card makes it even easier for visitors to get around cheaply.

Here are a few things to do and see in this wonderful city:

Visit El Catedral: This gorgeous cathedral is set in the center of the ancient Roman quarter ofValencia. Like many ancient buildings in coastalSpain, elements of Moorish, Baroque and renaissance style are present from conquerors of different religious backgrounds that have controlled the city throughout its history. Many additions to and subtractions from the cathedral were made during the 1600s, 1700s and early 1800s and the present day building is a beautiful collision of stylistic influences. The famous chalice known as the Santo Caliz sits in the cathedral, said by some to be the fabled Holy Grail.

Stretch your mind at La Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencias: Images of the iconic center for Arts and Sciencescan be seen on almost every website and pamphlet aboutValencia. The center houses a museum, an IMAX theater, an aquarium, a planetarium, a laser dome and an opera house. Visitors young and old are encouraged to exercise their brains while touching and interacting with exhibits.

Picnic at El Parque Natural de la Albufera: Centered around a gorgeous lagoon, this nature reserve south ofValencia is a great spot for the tired traveler to retire for some peace and quiet outside of the hustle of the city proper. Over 250 species of migratory birds frequent the area during the summer months. Visitors can also gaze at myriad flora and fauna within the park. Three separate canals connect the wetlands and lagoon to theBalearicSea (part of theMediterranean.

See, smell and taste El Mercado Central: This 8000 square meter space market is one of the oldest running in Europe. The building surrounding the market was designed in 1914 by architects Francisco Guardia and Alejandro Soler. Vendors sell meat, vegetables, fruit fish and more in over 1,000 stands. Come for the sights, smells and tastes in the early morning and then grab breakfast or lunch at one of the many restaurants and tapas bars surrounding the market.

Watch Valencia FC Play: You can’t visitSpain (orEurope for that matter) without attending a soccer match. Founded in 1919, Valencia FC is one of the top clubs inSpain. The club plays in La Liga against powerhouses like Real Madrid and FC Barcelona, the current Liga and European champs. A brand new 75,000 seat stadium opened inValencia in 2011.

Spend a day exploring El Instituto Valenciano de Arte Moderno: The Valencia Museum of Modern Art is made up of a modern building and a 13th century building that was formerly a convent. The museum features painting, sculptures, photography, drawings, concerts and more from modern artists inSpain and around the world. It is open Monday and Thursday from 10am to 7pm and Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 10am to 10pm. Entry is only 2 Euros per person.

People watch on el Calle Caballero: This chic street full of shopping, cafes and bars is the best spot in the city to enjoy a coffee, read a book, or gaze at passers-by. Calle Caballero is part of Barrio del Carmen in the old town ofValencia and is frequented byValencia’s young and beautiful citizens.

El Mercado Central: This 8000 square meter space market is one of the oldest running in Europe. The building surrounding the market was designed in 1914 by architects Francisco Guardia and Alejandro Soler. Vendors sell meat, vegetables, fruit fish and more in over 1,000 stands. Come for the sights, smells and tastes in the early morning and then grab breakfast or lunch at one of the many restaurants and tapas bars surrounding the market.

Stretch your mind at La Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencias: Images of the iconic center for Arts and Sciencescan be seen on almost every website and pamphlet about Valencia. The center houses a museum, an IMAX theater, an aquarium, a planetarium, a laser dome and an opera house. Visitors young and old are encouraged to exercise their brains while touching and interacting with exhibits.

 Picnic at El Parque Natural de la Albufera: Centered around a gorgeous lagoon, this nature reserve south of Valencia is a great spot for the tired traveler to retire for some peace and quiet outside of the hustle of the city proper. Over 250 species of migratory birds frequent the area during the summer months. Visitors can also gaze at myriad flora and fauna within the park. Three separate canals connect the wetlands and lagoon to the Balearic Sea (part of the Mediterranean)

Visit El Catedral: This gorgeous cathedral is set in the center of the ancient Roman quarter of Valencia. Like many ancient buildings in coastal Spain, elements of Moorish, Baroque and renaissance style are present from conquerors of different religious backgrounds that have controlled the city throughout its history. Many additions to and subtractions from the cathedral were made during the 1600s, 1700s and early 1800s and the present day building is a beautiful collision of stylistic influences. The famous chalice known as the Santo Caliz sits in the cathedral, said by some to be the fabled Holy Grail.

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Publicado enPublished inPublished in: Tours, Valencia Guide